DATÇA
Datca
 
The Datca Peninsula is a long, narrow, mountainous finger of land that stretches west of Marmaris for about 100km, separating the Mediterranean and Aegean seas, offering simplicity, unspoilt natural beauty and a countless string of secluded bays to explore. As you drive along the narrow twisty road from Hisarönü towards Datca, you'll catch glimpses of turquoise sea through pine-clad ravines on both sides and nothing but a couple of tiny villages and dramatic scenery will be seen before arriving in Datca.
  
Datca situated half way along the mountainous, pine forested peninsula is an idyllic resort. There is a lively harbour set in stunning scenery whose relaxed happy atmosphere will captivate you immediately. The entire region is a combination of traditional Turkish friendliness and hospitality, tranquility, sophistication and good fun. You can choose to seek any or all of these qualities as the mood takes. Discover the real Turkey, unspoilt and away from the crowds. If you are seeking a totally relaxing holiday in magnificent surroundings, Datca is for you.
 
Old Datca  (Resadiye)
The main town (also called Resadiye) is set a few kilometres inland. Datca-harbour, a town of speawling summer colonies and rackety nightlife, occupies a narrow isthmus flunked by two bays. In between the two, an inconspicuous side route leads to the quint village of Old cialis coupons Datca.This little Mediterranean hamlet comes as a pleasant surprise after the eyesore of modern Datca. 
Hayitbuku  
The houses were mostly built by Greeks who lived here until the Exchange of 1923. They are made of honey-coloured limestone, and hide behind high garden walls heaving with bougainvillea and honeysuckle. A number of urban refugees, both Turkish and European, have carried out beautifully restrained renovations. 
Cnidos
Ferries to Bodrum run in summer from the port of Körmen, 9 km to the north. An unpaved road leads  to the ruins of Cnidus at the western tip of the Datca Peninsula through spectacularly wild scenery.
 
The Datca area is famous for the 3 Bs: bal - honey; badem - almonds and balik - fish. Spring is a delight with almond trees in full bloom and the crops are harvested in peak season.
 
From the southern end of the Gulf of Gokova stretching to a headland between the Greek islands of Symi and Rhodes is one of southwest Turkey's most scenic and least commercialised regions, the beautiful Loryma Peninsula. Situated just to the east of the Datca peninsula, the Loryma Peninsula is scarcely populated and barely touched by tourism. Rugged peaks and deep valleys shaded by olive groves and pine forests are punctuated sporadically by sleepy villages making the area suitable for those who wish to take life at a leisurely pace, delighting in the glorious land- and sea-scapes, and swimming in bays that are clear enough to render snorkelling equipment obsolete. In ancient times Loryma was primarily a harbour of sanctuary and not a commercial harbour, and the fort at the entrance of the magnificent harbour still stands today. On the west side of the bay there are a few restaurants, but apart from this no other modern settlement moved in after the ancients left. So far this has kept development particularly low and the locals exceptionally friendly.